Monday, September 15, 2014
superseventies:

Gram Parsons

superseventies:

Gram Parsons

Thursday, September 11, 2014
degrassi:

Dinner, anyone? ‪#‎NowImHungry‬ ‪#‎BestThingInTheOffice‬

paige looks so fierce. also, l’original! gagner! french on a mac n cheese box!

degrassi:

Dinner, anyone? ‪#‎NowImHungry‬ ‪#‎BestThingInTheOffice‬

paige looks so fierce. also, l’original! gagner! french on a mac n cheese box!

Wednesday, September 10, 2014
that is an entire IKEA couch stuffed in the back of my volvo xc70. best car ever? pretty much.

that is an entire IKEA couch stuffed in the back of my volvo xc70. best car ever? pretty much.

Monday, September 8, 2014
Shame on all of us. Shame on us that we need to actually see the video tape of Janay Rice getting knocked unconscious to actually realize that violence against women took place in that elevator. Shame on the Ravens for treating violence against women like an exercise in public relations. Shame on the NFL for being so untrustworthy - whether we’re talking about concussions, players health, and now violence against women - that nobody in their right mind should believe them when they say that they haven’t seen this tape before. But most important, shame on all of us for not actually thinking about Janay Rice at this moment in particular and what it’s doing to her that this video tape is now being released and re-released. We were all very upset with good reason about celebrities having their photos hacked and their nudes out there, and what it means to click on those videos, I’m just wondering, if everybody clicking on this video tape, how does that serve the interests of Janay Rice in this very difficult time in her life? Dave Zirin, on The Reid Report just now (via mar-see-ah)
Sunday, September 7, 2014
"hey, i’ve never used a computer before! i should take an online class"! - every single one of my students this semester

"hey, i’ve never used a computer before! i should take an online class"! - every single one of my students this semester

Saturday, September 6, 2014

(Source: electricdoc)

Friday, September 5, 2014
orioles:

Miguel’s 1st complete-game shutout game ball.

orioles:

Miguel’s 1st complete-game shutout game ball.

i was super excited to ride my bike to work today and i did, and it was great, and then it started to rain like crazy so my friend mandi gave me a ride home in the deluge. later ryan and i drove up to campus and put the bike in my station wagon and took it home. this photo is from the return trip and i’m happy but still kind of annoyed that i didn’t get to ride it home, because that’s the downhill part which is the fun part!

i was super excited to ride my bike to work today and i did, and it was great, and then it started to rain like crazy so my friend mandi gave me a ride home in the deluge. later ryan and i drove up to campus and put the bike in my station wagon and took it home. this photo is from the return trip and i’m happy but still kind of annoyed that i didn’t get to ride it home, because that’s the downhill part which is the fun part!

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Who are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get 20 Kids?”
Dorothy DeBolt already had five children of her own when she and her first husband, Ted Atwood, adopted two boys from Korea. After he passed away in 1963, she would adopt two paraplegic girls from Vietnam, bringing the total to nine.
For seven years she would live as a single mom of nine children. She met her second husband, Bob, on a blind date in the late 1960s. They married in 1970 and he brought his daughter into the fold bringing the newly formed DeBolt-Atwood family to 10.
By 1977 they would take in nine more children from around the globe, often with physical or emotional disabilities. This included a girl from Korea who the orphanage dubbed “The Child Who Never Smiles” because she had lost one eye and was blind in the other. (After a corneal transplant she could see and ran around the house smiling and laughing at her siblings’ faces.) There was the boy from Vietnam who saw his parents killed in a bombing who was often found under a table in the fetal position. There was the African American girl who was born without arms or legs.
The home was never modified and the children had to learn to get around the two-story house regardless of their disability. 
Also in 1977, a documentary of their lives was released titled Who Are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get Nineteen Kids? Directed by Ted Korty and narrated by Henry Winkler, the DeBolts hosted a film crew in their home for 2 1/2 years. It was worth it as the film won an Academy Award for Best Feature Documentary in 1978. 
In 1979 the DeBolts adopted one more child, from Mexico, bringing the final total to 20. 
Several years earlier Dorothy and Bob founded Adopt a Special Kid which focused on the adoption of children with special needs. It was the first of its kind in the United States.
Dorothy DeBolt, matriarch of this amazing family, died on February 24 at the age of 89. She is survived by her husband Bob who is 81. Eighteen of their children are still alive along with 27 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.
Sources: LA Times obituary, 1988 LA Times article, IMDB and Wikipedia
(Image of the DeBolts, circa 1979, with their twenty children is courtesy of Hot Saas’s Pop Culture Safari)
Personal note: Since 2008, Mrs. OOTD and I have served as foster parents. Over that time we have welcomed seven children into our home, adopted one, returned two home, and are on the path to adopt three more. (We also have an amazing 8-year-old biological son, who I’ve mentioned before.) There are 300,000 foster children in the United States and more than half are waiting to be adopted. I am happy to take questions on foster care/adoption.

i was obsessed with “who are the debolts? (and where did they get nineteen kids?)” a few years ago and i want to watch it again.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Who are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get 20 Kids?”

Dorothy DeBolt already had five children of her own when she and her first husband, Ted Atwood, adopted two boys from Korea. After he passed away in 1963, she would adopt two paraplegic girls from Vietnam, bringing the total to nine.

For seven years she would live as a single mom of nine children. She met her second husband, Bob, on a blind date in the late 1960s. They married in 1970 and he brought his daughter into the fold bringing the newly formed DeBolt-Atwood family to 10.

By 1977 they would take in nine more children from around the globe, often with physical or emotional disabilities. This included a girl from Korea who the orphanage dubbed “The Child Who Never Smiles” because she had lost one eye and was blind in the other. (After a corneal transplant she could see and ran around the house smiling and laughing at her siblings’ faces.) There was the boy from Vietnam who saw his parents killed in a bombing who was often found under a table in the fetal position. There was the African American girl who was born without arms or legs.

The home was never modified and the children had to learn to get around the two-story house regardless of their disability. 

Also in 1977, a documentary of their lives was released titled Who Are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get Nineteen Kids? Directed by Ted Korty and narrated by Henry Winkler, the DeBolts hosted a film crew in their home for 2 1/2 years. It was worth it as the film won an Academy Award for Best Feature Documentary in 1978. 

In 1979 the DeBolts adopted one more child, from Mexico, bringing the final total to 20. 

Several years earlier Dorothy and Bob founded Adopt a Special Kid which focused on the adoption of children with special needs. It was the first of its kind in the United States.

Dorothy DeBolt, matriarch of this amazing family, died on February 24 at the age of 89. She is survived by her husband Bob who is 81. Eighteen of their children are still alive along with 27 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

Sources: LA Times obituary, 1988 LA Times article, IMDB and Wikipedia

(Image of the DeBolts, circa 1979, with their twenty children is courtesy of Hot Saas’s Pop Culture Safari)

Personal note: Since 2008, Mrs. OOTD and I have served as foster parents. Over that time we have welcomed seven children into our home, adopted one, returned two home, and are on the path to adopt three more. (We also have an amazing 8-year-old biological son, who I’ve mentioned before.) There are 300,000 foster children in the United States and more than half are waiting to be adopted. I am happy to take questions on foster care/adoption.

i was obsessed with “who are the debolts? (and where did they get nineteen kids?)” a few years ago and i want to watch it again.